What Are the Risk Factors for Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

What Are the Risk Factors for Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

What Are the Risk Factors for Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction?

• Atopy. Atopy refers to the genetic tendency to develop allergic rhinitis, asthma, and eczema. Atopic patients are prone to exercise- induced bronchoconstriction.

• Strenuous exercise. Strenuous exercise includes skiing, football, cross-country, hockey, swimming, and soccer. Athletes who perform these forms of strenuous exercise, particularly in cold weather, have an increased risk of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, also known as exercise-induced asthma, is caused by the narrowing of the bronchi after exercise, making it difficult to exhale air from the lungs and leading to asthma and its complications. Athletes who perform strenuous exercise inhale hot and/or cold air into the lungs, which triggers the constriction of the bronchi and causes exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. About 90% of asthma patients suffer from exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. It is estimated that 10% of the world population and 50% of all athletes have problems with exercise- induced bronchoconstriction.

What Are the Symptoms of Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction?

• Shortness of breath

• Difficulty breathing

• Coughing

• Asthma

• Tightening in the chest

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